Bennett’s Best – 10 tips for a NEW Year

Decide that this year – 2018 – you are going to try at least 10 new pathways to grow your business brand… feel free to add another 10 in your personal life!

1. Learn new things, about new subjects – Use alerts and e-newsletters to bring you opinions and topics you might not have tapped before – you can always unsubscribe later.  Pick things that intrigue you or you are seeing in the news or hearing about from friends, then commit to reading something about these new topics at least once a week.

2. Build a personal arsenal – start a personal Excel file of influencers, speakers at conferences you attended, friends, college alumni and professors … anyone you can turn to for advice or connections. The Excel file should have contact information and a notes column to remind you where you met them or why they are on this list.  Think of it as your future success list – sign up for their feeds, get alerts when they are quoted and link up on LinkedIn – you’ll be glad, I promise.

3. Embrace Artificial Intelligence – make it a priority to be the smart one about this subject.  Read something new every day of the work week – start by Googling ‘artificial intelligence’ and pick what interests you and take it from there.

4. Find your days – and use them to your advantage.www.daysoftheyear.com.  Sign up for free weekly email.

5. Tune into your instincts – does your heart, gut or brain say you should do something and you don’t.  My advice?  do it!  use chocolate cake for breakfast example….

6. Turn your thinking upside down – before you start any project ask yourself “what is the desired outcome?”  Write it on your to-do list to keep it the focus.

7. Security needs to be part of your everyday watch too.  It often lands at the feet of the PR and marketing pros to manage the aftermath of a crisis, disaster, public perception problem – and you should be way ahead and ready.  You have seconds to react, offer advice, move your team – so be ready. Tell your leadership, or be the leader and role model.  Be prepared.  The beginning of the year is a perfect time to have a ‘What If’ meeting and get the answers in writing.

New coined terms like ‘culturious’ (cultural immersion that satisfies your curiosity, according to Tauck who is using this term), “Keep it 100” means you are being true to yourself or a set of values, and “the emotional landscape” is full of acronyms and emoji’s – thanks to social media.

A local farmer writes a column about his life as a “foodpreneur” and calls himself a “farmacist”, his company name?  “The Farmacy” – says it all right?   Do you have a product or service that could create a new word?  Smarketing maybe?

8. Put it all together – differently – New coined terms like ‘culturious’ (Cultural immersion that satisfies your curiosity, according to Tauck who is using this term), “Keep it 100” means you are being true to yourself or a set of values, and “the emotional landscape” is full of acronyms and emoji’s – thanks to social media.  A local farmer writes a column about his life as a “foodpreneur” and calls himself a “Farmacists”, his company name?  “The Farmacy” – says it all right?   Do you have a product or service that could create a new word?  Smarketing maybe?

9. Get it in writing. No matter what you do, we’re being asked to sign agreements for more services.  To make sure that all those fees, surcharges, and taxes are disclosed up front, note  language along the lines of, “Neither Group nor its attendees are responsible for any fees or surcharges not enumerated in the contract (or signed off on at check in), or “good into perpituity in all mediums”.  Note language that is not clear and if you make a change initial the change and make copies.

10. See everything as an opportunity.  How many business cards have you given out lately?  Have you grown your LinkedIn, Facebook or other social media connections?  Set a goal to add 50 – 100 new contacts a month to your list, it’s easier than you might think!

Make 2018 the year you go for it, there will never be a better time.  Happy New Year!

AI Is What’s Next – As Communicators We Are The Front Line

Do a quick Google search for AI and you get a new definition from WikiPedia:  Artificial intelligence is being defined as Intelligent Agents.  Let that sink in.

AI is becoming part of all businesses and part of nearly every part of our lives.  From the way your communications are answered to the way you get to work – everything is changing thanks to artificial intelligence.   Having just attended three different conferences for clients; one on real estate, one on travel and one on school nutrition – I can tell you all three had at least one seminar on how this technology is changing our world.  As one speaker said:  “Ten years ago we did not realize the impact of social media, AI is already here and moving into the marketplace at warp speed.”

As communicators we are the front line.  We need to embrace this technology, understand it deeply and be able to explain how it is impacting our companies and clients to others.

As machines become intelligent there will be great ethical debates and concerns – be ready as you will be needed to shape the conversation.

TED has an excellent playlist about AI – https://www.ted.com/topics/ai

         This New York Times piece offers a summary of where we are: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/14/magazine/the-great-ai-awakening.html

The post below came from AdAge, here is a direct link to the full article:  http://adage.com/article/agency-news/chief-ai-officer-big-title-media-agencies/309667/?ito=792

Any time an explosive new technology takes hold, agencies have to navigate how it fits into their business. While some may be waiting until it has taken a deeper hold, others, like New York-based Crossmedia, are bullish.

The independent media agency just hired a new executive director of cognitive solutions, who will head up the agency’s work in that area — covering everything from client projects that use AI like chatbots or Alexa skills to other areas of cognitive solutions. The field includes data-driven creative work that might change according to weather, stock fluctuations or time of day, and data science, which encompasses deep learning and pattern detection.

For Karim Sanjabi, who’s taking on the new role, it’s a step agencies are going to have to take. Sanjabi previously started Freestyle Interactive, which was acquired by Carat Interactive in 2003, and most recently was CEO of Robot Stampede, a creative tech company based in San Francisco.

“If agencies don’t make this kind of change right now, and really understand they have to really commit to it, we’re going to have an evolutionary separation,” he said. “We’re going to have two different species of agencies: One that evolved with AI and one that didn’t.”

He said snubbing AI would be akin to an agency turning its back on social media 10 years ago.

Though Sanjabi has taken the top seat at Crossmedia’s new cognitive consulting practice, he wants to handle it in a way where the work bleeds across the entire agency, instead of siloing AI off into a separate business unit. His mandate, he said, is to help the agency sift through the tech options and find ways to improve internal operations and client solutions using these new concepts.

“I want our existing media buyers and planners, I want everyone in the company to think in terms of cognitive solutions,” he said.

“I just want to be a resource to everyone in the agency to help empower them to come up with this kind of stuff. This isn’t a standalone, separate thing — this is the core of the agency. We’re changing the way everyone thinks about this.”

Champions over chiefs
As the possibilities of AI are becoming known, agencies are grappling with the best way to bring in that knowledge.

“The power of this stuff is such that it surpasses traditional agency shiny object syndrome,” said Dave Meeker, a VP who focuses on innovation at Dentsu Aegis Network-owned digital marketing agency Isobar. “We see really the capabilities of what a well-trained or well-designed AI is capable of.”

Isobar doesn’t have a head of AI, but does rely on employees’ expertise to understand how it can help the business until it’s more deeply ingrained. Meeker said employees work on the forefront of new technologies, and once it really catches on, the company starts more formalized training across all employees. The company has an “Isobar Academy,” an online curriculum available to its 6,000 employees.

“Right now, we’re in this age of understanding this stuff. You need people with really specific domain expertise,” he said. “In time, that expertise becomes cooked into a lot of the software and things that we’re doing, to where it’s not like you then have to have an AI person because all of us kind of have the tools at our disposal that do that.”

Whatever the approach, the key to success, say agency vets, is incorporating the new technology in ways that everyone across the agency can master it. Which in turn could ultimately render the need for a chief of AI obsolete.

Tom Kelshaw, director of innovation at GroupM shop Maxus, said agencies have a history of hiring executives to head up areas like data, digital or innovation. The risk there, he said, is that “it tends to become stale.” Kelshaw pointed out that transformational new ideas should be absorbed across all leadership once a topic is understood, instead of letting it live with a sole executive or business unit.

At Maxus, Kelshaw said when it comes to AI and innovation more generally, his company relies on employees to figure out where tools and techniques can deliver operational efficiencies and improve clients’ business.

“It’s about getting champions, rather than chiefs, into the business,” he said.

Too soon?
Some agencies may feel it’s on the early side to make big investments into this area. Though digital agency PMG does a fair amount of work using AI, the agency doesn’t have any defined titles relating to cognitive or machine learning or artificial intelligence.

“Advertisers and brands realize the need for artificial intelligence, but very few are at the point where they’re going to the board and saying, ‘We’re betting everything on artificial intelligence,’ said Dustin Engel, head of analytics and data activation at PMG. “They know the risk of not being part of AI, but they’re not quite willing to bet the farm on that risk.”

He said factors like data quality make some areas of AI still relatively immature. PMG does work with clients on data onboarding, cleansing and standardizing so it will one day be useful in AI applications. It also uses AI when it come to data science and data innovation.

Engel added that AI appears to be polarizing with advertisers.

“Some are excited about it but don’t have clear use cases. Some are skeptical of the hype of AI being the business disruption panacea. Some are cautiously optimistic — stressing cautiously. So it may be early for advertisers as opposed to the agencies,” he wrote in an email. “As for PMG, we not only see AI possibilities in our client media programs but also in managing the operational complexity of our fast-growing business.”