Exceptional Role Models Make for Exceptional Careers

Christine Mau, named one of Ad Age’s “Women to Watch” and a former design director at Kimberly-Clark, says design must be brought into an organization’s full conversation, rather than considered an output.

American Marketing Association does an exceptional job of bringing us stories of people who we can learn from, emulate and follow.  A recent story in Marketing News gives insight into Christine Mau, read on!

Mau’s work has included the redesign of Kleenex boxes into oval and triangular formats, as well as the U by Kotex launch. The tampon brand presented its product in black and neon colors, a massive departure from the typical blue and white found in the feminine hygiene aisle.

This ability to talk about and design for what are sometimes considered taboo topics made her the prime candidate for co-creating the logo for No More, a movement for raising awareness and engagement around ending domestic violence and sexual assault.

The logo (pictured at right with Mau), which consists of a blue circle with a disappearing center—intended to evoke the concept of reducing the number of such experiences to zero—has been part of a global public service announcement effort that has received more than $2 billion in earned media.

https://www.ama.org/publications/eNewsletters/Marketing-News-Weekly/Pages/christine-mau-encourages-design-integration-in-marketing-process.aspx

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Starting From Scratch? Easy Steps To Establishing Your Brand On Social Media

One of the primary reasons that people buy products from a business is because they trust their name. If you’ve established credibility, then people easily see the value of your offerings.

Hence, building a successful brand name should be a priority. 

Social media has played a vital role in building this influence.

In fact, social media is an excellent starting point for most businesses to reach their target audience. It’s THE PLACE where consumers share their opinions about brands and interact with them.

And here is your motivator:  80% of consumers are more likely to evaluate solutions from the brands they follow on a social network.

So, in this article, I want to show you how to build an authentic and strong brand image on social media to amplify your media strategy efforts.

C8aiWXmU0AA2woaHere’s the right way to get started.

Create a social media brand persona guide and remain consistent across all channels

● Firstly, make all of your social media channels consistent.

● Start with having a professional profile picture that’s the same across channels.

● Funny, witty, casual, personal and conversational language all well on social media.

● You can also keep it formal and professional. Just try to embody your brand values and stay authentic in your communication.

● If you’re an individual your personal brand channels need to stay consistent. Also document your own brand persona. Here are four simple steps that you can follow for creating a guide.

1. Keep it short and sweet. Give just enough detail for people to feel like they have something to follow.

2. Make it pretty. You’ll want something that community and content managers, and even brand managers, will want to keep on their desks.

3. Designate a leader – and empower them. While many people should participate in the workshop, you’ll want a core team of 2 to 3 people who will lead the development of the voice and the output document.

4. Include examples.

Develop sample content that’s written within the new social tone of voice. Point out which personality traits were used and linguistic cues referenced for easy understanding.

Automate like a ninja. But, humanize your brand to deepen your relationship with your audience.

To get the most out of social media, stop pushing your content. Instead, show your human side, because social media users crave authenticity.

IMPORTANT TO NOTE:

● Social media is a two-way street. You can share your educating blog posts and updates. But, always ask for feedback and encourage discussions about your posts.

● Entertain your followers, by taking your audience behind the scenes and share a picture from your daily life.

● If you’re a company, then share pictures from your events. Or, simply share photos of your employees.

● Reply your audience comments. Make them believe you value and care them. 3. Decide the kind of content that you’ll share on different social media platforms

● Share exclusive content on all social media platforms where you hang out.

● If you don’t think a social media platform audience fits your brand and you don’t have the resources to handle content creation for the platform, then don’t use the platform.

●  (thank you Neil Patel, great job!)

http://neilpatel.com/blog/how-to-create-a-social-media-branding-strategy-from-scratch/?utm_content=buffere685f&utm_medium=buffer_social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=buffer_updates

KEEP IT GOING:   Create a content calendar and post frequently Here is social media calendar template by HubSpot and Buffer that you can use for planning your content.

For scheduling follow the below ways:

● Facebook: A couple of updates per day.

● Twitter: Three times per day (if you’ve got the resources, then you can even send 5+ tweets everyday) ● Instagram: Once per day.

● LinkedIn: Once per weekday.

Take care of the tactical aspects

Define your target audience: If you’re targeting entirely different kinds of people, than create multiple brand personas. Need help with defining your audience, read this article.

Assign tools and team: Use Buffer, HootSuite for scheduling updates on all of the major social media platforms. For writing updates, use excel spreadsheets. Have regular meetings with team members.

Learn more from this wonderful source:  www.neilpatel.com #socialsmarter

Why we click on news stories

For news organizations, clicks are tracked closely. They generate advertising revenue and help newsrooms to better understand audience interests. But what motivates news users to click?

great news headlineThe reasons are diverse and perhaps unexpected, according to a study forthcoming in the academic journal Journalism by Ph.D. candidate Tim Groot Kormelink and journalism studies professor Irene Costera Meijer at VU University Amsterdam. Kormelink and Meijer are part of the research consortium The New News Consumer.

Stories can garner clicks — or lose out on clicks — for many different reasons. To reach this conclusion, Kormelink and Meijer asked 56 different news users to “think aloud,” or share exactly what passed through their minds while browsing news on a site and device of their choosing. The 20- to 40-minute interviews were transcribed and then carefully analyzed to find themes.

Common reasons for clicking included the personal relevance or social utility of news. Stories that spoke to people’s lives and their need to be informed in social settings attracted interest.

“Common reasons for clicking included the personal relevance or social utility of news

Unsurprisingly, news about nearby locations and about unexpected events garnered more clicks. The important reminder from this research, however, is how much variability there is in what counts as “nearby,” and what counts as “unexpected.” For example, one participant saw an event happening 15 miles away as near, but another did not.

headlines for blog in 2017News about topics that seemed familiar, but that participants couldn’t quite recall, also generated clicks. Think of reading a headline about a name that sounds familiar, but you can’t quite remember who it is.

Site design and layout affected people’s decisions about what news to view. Prominently placed news and attention-grabbing visuals both motivated clicks, but a long perceived load time or presence of videos, however, deterred clicks in some instances. This was because participants wanted to conserve their time and data plans.

The emotional impact of a headline influenced clicking behavior. Headlines conveying disheartening news attracted attention up to a point — if the information seemed too disheartening, people avoided the story. Light-hearted news also resulted in clicks among those looking for stories would lift their spirits. Stories that actively irritated some of the participants, such as an article describing an anti-gay law in Uganda, yielded clicks.

Several expected reasons for clicking on news articles were surprisingly absent from the decisions described by the news browsers. The timeliness or recency of the article were rarely mentioned as reasons to click on a story. Further, few said that they chose articles because they agreed with the conclusions reached.

The timeliness or recency of the article were rarely mentioned as reasons to click on a story”

In addition to uncovering reasons for clicking on news, the authors also learned why people avoid clicking on news.

A number of the study participants said that they weren’t interested in news that seemed too obvious, or that seemed to replicate what they already knew. They also avoided stories that seemed to require background knowledge, or that appeared to provide the middle of an unfolding story.

headlines breaking news 3Headlines that conveyed most of the information about the story — even though the topic may have been of great interest — also did not earn clicks. And in some instances, people didn’t click on stories because of their schedule — longer news stories, for instance, didn’t make sense when people were checking the news briefly on the way to work.

The research provides ample evidence that there are many different reasons that people click on news — in particular, they are drawn to news that is relevant to personal interests or happened nearby, news that gives them something to talk about, and news that provokes emotional responses.

The most interesting takeaway from this research is the potential ideas about how to present news in ways that cater to why people click in the first place. For some, a set of short headlines is sufficient — this would support creating newsletters and quick summaries. Allowing people to save articles for later can help those who don’t have time to read longer stories during certain times of day. Finding ways to adopt a user-centered approach in news design could be the true answer to more clicks.

Research shows people click on stories that happened nearby or gives them something to talk about.

This article courtesy of American Press Institute, insights, tools and research to advance journalism.

Micro Moments = Newest Battleground for Marketers

Micro moments are the intersection of sending the right message at the right time and you reach the consumer just when they are ready to buy.   The good news is that consumers are actively look at ‘media’ on their cell phones and computers – nearly 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  Remember when advertisers were sure no one was ‘listening’ on holidays or weekends?  Thanks to the mobile consumer there is a fundamental change and we now have thousands of these ‘moments’ available to us as marketers.connections-2

How best to find these micro moments?  Think With Google posted this story below and I had a micro-moment just reading it – hope you do too!

Consumer behavior has changed forever. Today’s battle for hearts, minds, and dollars is won (or lost) in micro-moments—intent-driven moments of decision-making and preference-shaping that occur throughout the entire consumer journey. Read more about this new mental model for marketing.

Every day your customers are checking the time, texting a spouse, chatting with friends on social media.

But then there are the other moments—the I want-to-know moments, I want-to-go moments, I want-to-do moments, and I want-to-buy moments—that really matter. We call these “micro-moments,” and they’re game changers for both consumers and brands.

Micro-Moments

Real-time, intent-driven micro-moments are the new battlegrounds for brands.

Consider these findings from some recent research we conducted:

• Of leisure travelers who are smartphone users, 69% search for travel ideas during spare moments, like when they’re standing in line or waiting for the subway. Nearly half of those travelers go on to book their choices through an entirely separate channel.

• Of smartphone users, 91% look up information on their smartphones while in the middle of a task.

• Of smartphone users, 82% consult their phones while they’re standing in a store deciding which product to buy. One in 10 of those end up buying a different product than they had planned.

• Of online consumers, 69% agree that the quality, timing, or relevance of a company’s message influences their perception of a brand.

The successful brands will be those that have a strategy for understanding and meeting consumers’ needs in these micro-moments.

What Benefits and Perks Are Being Offered to PR and Marketing Professionals? Here’s the list!

With thanks to Dennis Spring of Spring Associates, Inc. here is their ever-growing list of 91 benefits being offered to PR and marketing communications professionals.  To learn more about Spring Associates, specializing in executive recruiting in PR & corporate communications, here is their website:  Website: springassociates.com

                                  Bucket List of 91 Benefits and Perks
  • Assistance with continuing education courses
  • Assistance with student loan debt
  • Birthday off
  • **Biz class seat for 3 hour+ flight
  • Casual dress policy
  • **Charitable matching contribution
  • Childcare
  • *COBRA (need 20+ employees)
  • Clothing allowance
  • Commutation assistance
  • **Commuter card
  • Company credit card
  • Company smartphone or laptop
  • **Country club membership
  • Defined benefit pension plan
  • Defined contribution pension plan
  • Disability insurance
  • Employee assistance program
  • **Employee referral bonus
  • Employee stock purchase plan
  • **Employer funded annuity
  • Exceptional service bonus
  • Expense account
  • *Family and medical leave
  • Family (or pet) to work days
  • Flexible work schedule
  • Food discounts
  • Free admission to specified museums
  • **Free coffee
  • Free massages
  • Free parking
  • Golden parachute
  • Grooming allowance
  • Gym membership
  • Health insurance
  • *Health insurance for companies (with 50+employees)
  • Health savings acct (HSA, FSA, HRP & HRA)
  • Holiday parties
  • Hybrid car allowance
  • Jury duty supplemental payment
  • Lactation room
  • Liberal vacation policy
  • Life insurance
  • Matching charitable gift program
  • **Monthly car allowance contribution
  • **Monthly mobile contribution
  • New business commission
  • On-site amenities, e.g, haircut, spa, cafeteria, dental care
  • Paid association membership
  • Paid holidays
  • Paid internships
  • Paid family leave
  • Paid holidays off
  • Paid legal costs for H-1B visa
  • *Paid maternity leave
  • Paid maternity leave (less than 50 employees)
  • Paid or unpaid sabbatical
  • Paid time off for bereavement
  • Paid time off during summer
  • Paid time off to join protest rallies
  • Paid volunteer time off
  • Performance bonus
  • **Productivity contests
  • Profit sharing
  • Relaxation lounge
  • Relocation assistance
  • Retirement savings plan
  • Semi-annual performance review
  • Service recognition awards
  • Severance pay
  • Sick and personal days
  • Sign-on bonus
  • *Social security, Medicare & FICA
  • Sponsor approved college degree programs
  • Stand-up comedy training
  • Stock options
  • Summer hours
  • Team-building company retreats
  • Telecommuting options
  • **Tenured sabbatical
  • Tickets for sporting events
  • **Travel retreats
  • Tuition assistance
  • *Unemployment insurance
  • **Unlimited vacation days
  • Vision insurance
  • **Weekly happy hours
  • Wellness pay
  • Work remotely
  • Workers’ compensation insurance
  • Yoga breaks
TOTAL = 91
* = government mandated
** = added since 08/03/17

A great list, helping employers better understand what they are up against as we compete for the best candidates!

8/2/1982 – 35 Years Ago … A Burning Desire

renderedWith a burning desire to open an agency and think big, do things differently, follow my instincts and have the freedom to make a difference, I took a leap of faith and my savings and opened Bennett & Company on the easy to remember date of 8/2/82.

I’ve never looked back and for the life it has given me, I could not be more grateful.

Thirty-five years ago I opened what is today Bennett & Company PR and Marketing. Miami was a new city for me and alive with possibilities. There was no better place on the planet to open this agency and thanks to that beginning it has thrived.  Together the wonderful people who have been part of Bennett & Company have evolved, prospered and made a difference for one another, for our clients and our community.

Also in 1982:  The smiley, the very first emoticon, was introduced

The Weather Channel premiered and so did USA Today

EPCOT opened at Walt Disney World

and the average purchase price of a home was $67,800

The second office in Orlando turned into the main office in the late 1990’s as the internet allowed the team and the clients to be connected from anywhere.  New professionals from as far away as Poland and Spain joined the team as clients had needs and we became a 24/7 operation with the freedom to be global.  Experiences have included working with a President and a Pope as well as start-up entrepreneurs,  some of the largest companies in the world and others who had big visions and allowed us to help them come to life.

For me there is no greater satisfaction than knowing as the world has changed, so did the agency, and so did I.  My mother often said “Let me get this straight, you are doing what you love and people pay you?”  Yes Mom that pretty much says it all and I wish you were here to celebrate with us.

Thank you to all those who have played a part in this ongoing journey.  

Thank you in advance for what’s to come.

Happy 35th Anniversary Bennett & Company!

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Do NOT Hire a Social Media Consultant Before You Ask These 10 Questions

What is a “Social Media Consultant”?  It could be anyone with a personal Facebook Page and a large number of Twitter followers wanting to sell you on their services.

I too often see someone touting this service (for far too high a cost) who have only a Twitter account or not much of a personal or business presence anywhere on the web.  And while these “consultants” might be available the question is are they right for you?  

You ONLY want someone who knows your industry 

and has the maturity to know what NOT to post too.

Once you make the decision to outsource, you’ll want to strongly vet potential consultants and/or agencies.

Here are 10 things Social Media Today recommends you ask or consider:

1. Can they demonstrate a proven track record?

Ask what brands the person or agency has worked with and is currently working with (to ensure they’re not working with a competing brand).

Don’t be shy about asking for references. Ask about a brand they worked with where something didn’t work out – how did they handle that? Were they able to quickly adapt and change course? Do they have the necessary experience in your industry to properly advance your business?

The more they know about your industry, the less of a learning curve there’ll be, and the more resources they’ll bring to your brand. What are their first steps when taking on new clients?

2. Where can I find current and past examples of your work?

Anyone with experience will be readily able to show you a portfolio of work as well as links to initiatives they’ve either run or been involved in creating.

Look for campaigns that have been repeated. You know things are working when you keep doing it.

Have the campaigns led to brand exposure? Sales leads? Will this experience help your market?

3. Who will be handling my account and what background does this person come from?

This is the biggest question – don’t buy into a sales pitch and then get a very junior person.

The background of each person working on behalf of your brand is important. If you’re looking for marketing, PR and/or social media help, you want people that have leveraged those skills working with prior companies.

Do these people have knowledge and experience with trends in these areas?

4. How will we track ROI?

We know that not everything has immediate return that’s trackable when it comes to social media. But you can track most things.

You want to know that this consultant or agency isn’t simply looking to add likes, followers or fans, but is actually able to analyze conversion rates.

Brands that hire an outside agency will want to know that the agency or consultant is consistently monitoring results, and is being held accountable. You’ll want to know there’s a standard monitoring and reporting process in place that works for both you and the agency or consultant.

5. What is their process for reporting?

How often will you meet with them? How often will you be provided status updates or check-ins?

If the agency doesn’t have a method to suggest immediately to you on how they’ll communicate, it might be a red flag that the agency isn’t as connected with their clients as you’ll want to be (or that they haven’t even thought of this yet).

6. What will you do if something goes wrong?

How would you handle a social media crisis? This is the question that will give you real insight into their value.

Marketing campaigns that look great on paper can go wrong in application, no matter how seasoned the consultant is.

How will they react? How do they respond to negative reviews? Tweets? Negative Facebook comments?

7. How do they come up with strategic plans?

How much does writing content figure into their experience and plan for your business? A good consultant will have a workflow that works for them and you.

They’ll know how to integrate social media with PR and traditional media.

They’ll want to talk to your sales team and find out what plans they have and will know how to integrate them into all they are doing.

8. How will content be developed?

And, will you have to approve all of the content written on behalf of your brand? Will it all have to be planned, or will you trust this person or agency to create on-the-fly content for you? Does this person have the experience necessary to understand the nuances of writing content specific for each platform?

Content developed for your brand needs to be likeable and shareable. A consultant or agency should be able to show you examples of previously created content for other clients, as well as their content calendar, or what their content creation process looks like.

9. What does success look like, and how will we measure it?

Brands that are investing in consultants and agencies must have clear goals in mind when starting this process. An agency should be able to help you achieve your KPIs. The consultant or agency you choose will help you establish these KPIs and will (with you) write strategies and tactics to hit those goals.

10. What will this cost?

Outside of the monthly retainer or fee you agree to with the consultant or agency, you want to know that your budget is being kept in mind in all they’re doing.

Thank you http://www.socialmediatoday.com – one of my favorite sources for all things social!