VISUAL CONTENT MARKETING – When Words Are Secondary

Sometimes words are secondary …

Take a look at more visuals below which tell the story of Visual Content Marketing – and ask yourself if your video, photography and graphics budget might need an increase?

General Visual Content Stats

1) Researchers found that colored visuals increase people’s willingness to read a piece of content by 80%.

2) When people hear information, they’re likely to remember only 10% of that information three days later. However, if a relevant image is paired with that same information, people retained 65% of the information three days later.

3) 46% of marketers say photography is critical to their current marketing and storytelling strategies.

4) 34% of marketers selected visual assets as their most important content, behind blogging (45%) and before videos (19%).

5) 65% of senior marketing executives believe that visual assets (photos, video, illustrations and infographics) are core to how their brand story is communicated.

6) Content with relevant images gets 94% more views than content without relevant images.

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Image Credit: QuickSprout

7) Only 27% of marketers have a process in place to aggregate, organize, and manage the visual assets being used across their marketing teams. Tweet this stat! (Source)

8) 39% of marketers believe that more of their budget should be allocated to the acquisition or creation of compelling visual assets. Tweet this stat! (Source)

9) 73% of content creators plan to prioritize creating more engaging content in 2016, and 55% plan to prioritize creating visual content. Tweet this stat!(Source)

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Image Credit: Content Marketing Institute

Video Stats

10) 51.9% of marketing professionals worldwide name video as the type of content with the best ROI.

11) Shoppers who view video are 1.81X more likely to purchase than non-viewers.

12) Using the word “video” in an email subject line boosts open rates by 19%, click-through rates by 65% and reduces unsubscribes by 26%.

13) Midway through 2015, mobile video plays exceeded 44% — up 74% from 2014 and up a whopping 844% since 2012.

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Image Credit: Ooyala

14) Between April 2015 and November 2015, the amount of average daily video views on Facebook doubled from 4 billion video views per day to 8 billion.

15) In July 2015, Periscope users were watching 40 years’ worth of videos every day.

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Image Credit: FastCompany

16) In Q2 of 2015, mobile phones (34%) and tablets (15%) combined for 49% of video ad impressions — up from 38% in Q1 of 2015. Publishers saw PC impressions drop from 62% to 50% in the previous quarter. 

17) Syndacast predicts 74% of all internet traffic in 2017 will be video.

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Image Credit: Syndacast

Big thanks for these 17 tips in 2017 to http://www.hubspot.com!

Today CCO’s and PR Professionals Focus on Cyber Threats and Employees As Much As Media Contacts

shutterstock_197903273Reputation management was a term I heard in one of my first public relations classes in college.  Whether the person handling an organization’s reputation is a PR professional or holds the title of CCO (Chief Communications Officer) this responsibility is critical and expanding as new threats impact how the consumer and Wall Street see your organization.

The study below shows what keeps those charged with the management of an organization’s reputation up at night.

AREAS OF CONCERN FACING CCOs

  • More than one out of two global CCOs (53 percent) have been impacted by shareholder activism. Of those who have been impacted by shareholder activism, 92 percent say their department was very or somewhat involved in addressing the event.
  • Nearly half of global CCOs (47 percent) spend a great deal or a lot of their time preparing for or dealing with cyber security, followed by understanding shifts in consumer spending behaviors (45 percent) and managing financial crises (44 percent).
  • 80 percent of global CCOs believe that marketing and communications departments are more collaborative than ever, and 54 percent expect the two functions to be fully integrated in the next few years.
  • When asked what would be the one thing global CCOs would most like to focus on in their role if they had the time, the top answer was reputation (28 percent). (This question was asked on an open-ended basis.)

“As seen in this study, reputation management is a prime responsibility of the corporate communications position today. Nearly every CCO, 93 percent, places this responsibility at the top of their lists, regardless of region,” said Leslie Gaines-Ross, chief reputation strategist at Weber Shandwick, in the release. “Clearly, global CCOs take their jobs as reputation guardians seriously and are ever-vigilant about protecting their company reputations from harm, whether it be cyber threats, crises of any kind, or the growing importance of employee engagement.”

Emerging marketing and communications trends have redefined the C-suite’s perspective on branding, and have also reshaped the roles of PR leaders. What are the top concerns for top comms execs in this evolving landscape? New research shows more than seven in 10 global chief communications officers (CCOs) reporting that digital communications ranks as their top priority for the next 18 months—and in North America, the highest priority for top CCOs is employee engagement, according to a new report from leadership consultancy Spencer Stuart and PR giant Weber Shandwick.

Additionally, more than half of global CCOs report that their companies have been impacted by shareholder activism, with an even higher percentage (58 percent) of CCOs in North America reporting impact, according to findings from The Rising CCO VI. Now in its sixth year, survey report explores how CCOs expect their responsibilities to evolve over time in a rapidly changing world.

“Effective and engaging employee communications is in great demand today as the communications function continues to touch all parts of a company’s business,” said George Jamison, who leads Spencer Stuart’s corp comms business, in a news release.

“CEOs are asking their top communications leaders to ensure that employees internalize strategy and company purpose. Our research shows that CCOs are working hard to drive employee advocacy and deepen their relationships with stakeholders both within and outside the company.”

 DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS NOW A STRATEGIC PARTNER, HIRING PRIORITY

Digital communications is reported as the top area of focus globally for the next 18 months and is a top hiring priority for the near future. In North America, digital communications is the second top area of focus for the next 18 months, behind employee advocacy/engagement.  Importantly, CCOs in every region also report that digital and social media would be their closest working partners in the future. This aligns with a related trend of using data analytics widely to evaluate corporate reputation, refine messaging, and identify company supporters and allies, according to the study.

FOCUSING ON EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS AND ENGAGEMENT

The importance of employee communications as a top tier priority differs regionally among global CCOs. By very wide margins, North American CCOs (90 percent) report that employee communications is a top tier responsibility compared to 70 percent of EMEA CCOs. In line with North American CCOs’ strong focus on employee communications, these leading comms pros in North America are also more likely to report that employee advocacy and engagement will grow in importance in their portfolio of responsibilities over the next 12 to 18 months compared to EMEA CCOs (70 percent vs. 45 percent, respectively).

Global CCOs also plan to make hires in the employee engagement and internal communications field in the next 12-18 months. Specific positions cited include Global Head of Employee Engagement, Head of Enterprise Communications (Internal and Leadership) and Employee Engagement Specialist.

FOSTERING TIES TO HUMAN RESOURCES

As global CCOs focus on strengthening their connections with employees as part of their skill set today and in the near future, a large 83 percent report working closely with their human resources (HR) departments. Another 14 percent report that they do not currently work closely with HR, but their company would benefit from doing so. Global CCOs report that they work with their HR peers as often as they do with marketing (86 percent) and legal (83 percent) counterparts. Additionally, 79 percent of global CCOs expect to work more closely in the future with HR departments. These findings underscore the importance of internal alignment within organizations and the rising importance of employee advocacy and engagement in the years ahead.

By very wide margins, North American CCOs (93 percent) are more likely to count HR as close partners in how they do their jobs compared to 75 percent of CCOs from EMEA. When it comes to expectations about the next few years, North American and EMEA CCOs are in greater agreement that they will be working closely with their HR brethren (81 percent vs. 77 percent, respectively).

 

Shared from Bulldog Reporter one of the best sources for PR news.  www.bulldogreporter.com

Learn Something Good From United Airlines’ Very Bad Reaction

Another case of the big guy blaming someone else – and losing the opportunity to do something good.  Not only was the incident of the man being dragged off the plane horrific to see and hear, but the response from the president of United was nearly as bad.  Have these people learned nothing about kindness or corporate responsibility?

My social media is still full of reactions to this; none of them good.

United also did not apologize, did not take responsibility, and did not demonstrate empathy in either the leggings or the viral video case, as it did with the system outage. Further, the company used industry terms like “Contract of Carriage,” “overbooked,” and “re-accommodate” instead of talking like their passengers would talk.

These stories are a reminder to all brands that offline experiences can quickly come online, and if brands don’t get the offline experience right, they will suffer the consequences in social media. Everyone with a smartphone can snap a photo of their poor experience and post it to Facebook or Twitter in mere moments – and they’re doing so, at an alarming rate for brands.  When this happens, friends and followers are witnesses to the experience and often rally to support those who feel affronted.

Here is a link to an excellent review of this situation on Social Media Today… take a few minutes and let’s be the professionals who stand up for what is right.

http://www.socialmediatoday.com/smt-influencer/uniteds-social-media-nightmare-what-went-wrong

 

 

 

Let’s Get Visual — VISUAL!

A picture is worth a 1000 words – take a look here at how visuals impact your social media success – and why!

Infographic Stats

1) Eye-tracking studies show internet readers pay close attention to information-carrying images. In fact, when the images are relevant, readers spend more time looking at the images than they do reading text on the page.

2) Infographics are Liked and shared on social media 3X more than other any other type of content.

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3) Infographics were the B2B content marketing tactic with the biggest increase from 2014 to 2015, up from 51% to 62%.

4) People following directions with text and illustrations do 323% better than people following directions without illustrations.

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Image Credit: NeoMam

5) 60% of marketers predict the use of infographics will increase.

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Image Credit: CMO Council

Social Media Stats

6) Visual content is more than 40X more likely to get shared on social media than other types of content.

7) Articles with an image once every 75-100 words got double the number of social shares than articles with fewer images.

8) 71% of online marketers use visual assets in their social media marketing.

9) And a whopping 40% of B2C marketers say visual content is the most important type of content.

 10) Facebook posts with images see 2.3X more engagement than those without images.

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Image Credit: BuzzSumo

11) Buffer reported that for its user base, tweets with images received 150% more retweets than tweets without images. Tweet this stat! (Source)

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Image Credit: QuickSprout

12) The Instagram community has grown to more than 400 million as of September 2015.

13) On Instagram, photos showing faces get 38% more Likes than photos not showing faces. Tweet this stat! (Source)

14) Organic engagement on Facebook more than doubled in 2015, while organic engagement on Instagram almost halved. Tweet this stat! (Source)

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Image Credit: Forrester Research

15) 52% of teens use Instagram, and nearly as many (41%) use Snapchat. Tweet this stat! (Source)

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Image Credit: Pew Research Center

16) Snapchat has 100 million daily users, 65% of whom upload photos using the app. Tweet this stat! (Source)

17) Women continue to dominate Pinterest: 44% of online women use Pinterest compared with 16% of online men. Tweet this stat! (Source)

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Image Credit: Pew Research Centerpinterest-purchasing-power.jpg

18) Shopify users referred by Pinterest spend an average of $80 compared to the Facebook referral average of $40. Tweet this stat! (Source)

19) Pins on Pinterest have viral potential: Over 80% of pins are re-pins compared to 1.4% of tweets retweeted. Tweet this stat! (Source)

20) 88% of consumers have purchased a product they pinned, and 49% have purchased 5 or more products they’ve pinned. Tweet this stat! (Source)

Image Credit: J

Thanks to HubSpot for this amazing information and graphics – you caught my attention!  Another great resource I recommend to readers of my blog.  Take a look at http://www.hubspot.com.   Laura

YOUR posts are being viewed just like TV or print news – Are you a trusted source?

‘Who shared it?’: How Americans decide what news to trust on social media

This research was conducted by the Media Insight Project — an initiative of the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research

Introduction

When Americans encounter news on social media, how much they trust the content is determined less by who creates the news than by who shares it, according to a new experimental study from the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Whether readers trust the sharer, indeed, matters more than who produces the article —or even whether the article is produced by a real news organization or a fictional one, the study finds.

A trusted sharer results in more trust for the article

People who see a social media post from someone they trust evaluate the article more positively

 As social platforms such as Facebook or Twitter become major thoroughfares for news, the news organization that does the original reporting still matters. But the study demonstrates that who shares an article on a social media site like Facebook has an even bigger influence on whether people trust what they see.

The experimental results show that people who see an article from a trusted sharer, but one written by an unknown media source, have much more trust in the information than people who see the same article from a reputable media source shared by a person they do not trust.

The identity of the sharer even has an impact on consumers’ impressions of the news brand. The study demonstrates that when people see a post from a trusted person rather than an untrusted person, they feel more likely to recommend the news source to friends, follow the source on social media, and sign up for news alerts from the source.

All of this suggests that a news organization’s credibility both as a brand and for individual stories is significantly affected by what kinds of people are sharing it on social media sites such as Facebook. The sharers act as unofficial ambassadors for the brand, and the sharers’ credibility can influence readers’ opinions about the reporting source.

This new research by the Media Insight Project is part of an effort to study the elements of trust in news at a time of turbulence in the media. The results offer important new insights to publishers whose digital content increasingly is reaching people outside the domain of their own websites and apps. Indeed, the findings suggest that publishers increasingly need to think of their consumers as ambassadors for their brand. The findings also carry implications for people concerned about so-called fake news and for advocates of “news literacy,” the spread of consumer critical thinking skills. The findings also have implications for social networks that might be able to alter the presentation of content to give consumers more information about the source of the news.

A news organization’s credibility both as a brand and for individual stories is significantly affected by what kinds of people are sharing it on social media.

The new findings come from an experiment involving 1,489 Americans and their trust in news on social media.

The Next Generation of Consumers Cares About Charitable Ties

millenials

The new target demographic is Gen Z or iGen, those born between the mid-1990s and 2009.

They are a unique bunch, with unique tastes and habits that brand managers and marketers should get up to speed on.

Some marketers are already rolling; others have to play catchup. Here are some of Gen Z’s principal characteristics and how brands can reach them:

First, they have more available funds.

Members of Gen Z are in their late teens or early 20s. About half support themselves; the other half rely on their parents for financial support. This duel dependent/independent status makes them influential in household purchases, and some are consumers themselves.

Millennials are the most weighted down by student loan debt; Gen Z’ers aren’t quite there yet. Of those with student loan debt, three-fourths have not yet begun paying it off, so they have disposable income for purchases.

Second, Gen Z is an idealistic bunch.

They want to help make the world a better place and are more concerned with doing so than they are with making money. Don’t ignore this generation’s desire to sync up with “brands on a mission,” such as Toms Shoes, which implements a “one-for-one” giving model. For those who grew up in a time of instant gratification, the immediacy of giving back while making a purchase is very satisfying.

Add a charitable incentive or movement to your efforts. Make your plans to give back clear, and—equally important—make it easy for the buyers to give back. They want to change the world but don’t want that to be a complex process.

Last, they are online all the time.

Gen Z doesn’t know life without social media, smartphones and instant access to just about everything online. Unlike millennials, they don’t remember a time when being offline was a thing.

When targeting this cohort, marketers must make campaigns that worked for millennials must more persistent and technologically sophisticated. Go beyond Facebook and Twitter—your brand should have a Snapchat presence and a robust YouTube channel.

McDonald’s beefed up its Snapchat marketing efforts, and who followed? Gen Z. Filters enable the user to interact directly with a brand. Brand managers should tap into the platform’s geo-tagging filter opportunities.

Also, enlist a more relatable spokesperson or brand ambassador. Consider a YouTube star or Vine personality rather than a traditional celebrity. Most of us may not have heard of MagCon or know who Lele Pons is, but Gen Z knows who they are. They may not be “mainstream famous,” but members of Gen Z value their opinions and follow them online.

Phil Ahad is a senior vice president at Toluna QuickSurveys. A version of this post first appeared oniMediaConnection.